[Chamberlin, Russell, "The Emperor Charlemagne", 75.] [13] Gerberga then fled (according to Einhard, "for no reason at all")[14] with her sons and Count Autchar, one of Carloman's faithful nobles, to the court of Desiderius, who demanded of the new Pope Hadrian I that he anoint Carloman's sons as Kings of the Franks. The brothers shared possession of Aquitaine, which broke into rebellion upon the death of Pepin the Short; when Charlemagne in 769 led an army into Aquitaine to put down the revolt, Carloman led his own army there to assist, before quarrelling with his brother at Moncontour, near Poitiers, and withdrawing, troops and all. If so, it was swept away in 781, when Charlemagne had his son renamed as Pippin.References, Carloman II — de France Carloman II Roi de Francie occidentale …   Wikipédia en Français, CARLOMAN — (715 754) Fils aîné de Charles Martel et de Rotrude, Carloman a été élevé, comme son frère Pépin, à Saint Denis. Carloman's position was rescued, however, by Charlemagne's sudden repudiation of his Lombard wife, Desiderius' daughter. Multiple sources give Pepin's death as 8 July 810, and his place of burial as Mediolanum (modern Milan). It is also one translation of the Bulgarian name Kaliman :* Carloman, father of Pepin I (c. 560) * Carloman, Mayor of the Palace, the brother of Pepin the Short (716 ndash;754) *… …   Wikipedia, Carlomán — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Carlomán es el nombre de varios reyes francos y germánicos. [Davis, Raymond (Editor), "The Lives of the Eighth Century Popes", 102 n.76] After Carloman's death, Gerberga expected her elder son to become King, and for herself to rule as his regent; however, Carloman's former supporters – his cousin Adalhard, Abbot Fulrad of Saint Denis and Count Warin – turned against her, and invited Charlemagne to annex Carloman's territory, which he duly did. Carlomán I (hijo de Carlos Martel), hijo primogénito de Carlos Martel, tras un corto reinado abdicó en su hermano Pipino el Breve. Appointed by his father to govern the eastern frontier of… …   Universalium, Carloman — Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom. This had, perhaps, been a public gesture to honour the memory of the boy's uncle, and to quell any rumours about Charlemagne's treatment of his nephews. Desiderius, outraged and humiliated, appears to have made some sort of alliance with Carloman following this, in opposition to Charlemagne and the Papacy, which took the opportunity to declare itself against the Lombards.[8]. Carloman's position was rescued, however, by Charlemagne's sudden repudiation of his Lombard wife, Desiderius' daughter. Be that as it may, Pepin the Short's disposal of his kingdom appears to have exacerbated the bad relations between the pair, since it required co-operation between the pair and left both feeling cheated. [Davis, Raymond (Editor), "The Lives of the Eighth Century Popes", 102 n.76] After Carloman's death, Gerberga expected her elder son to become King, and for herself to rule as his regent; however, Carloman's former supporters – his cousin Adalhard, Abbot Fulrad of Saint Denis and Count Warin – turned against her, and invited Charlemagne to annex Carloman's territory, which he duly did. [Riche, Pierre, "The Carolingians", 97] Gerberga's flight ultimately precipitated Charlemagne's destruction of the Kingdom of the Lombards; he responded to Desiderius' support of Carloman's children, which threatened Charlemagne's own position, by sweeping into Italy and subjugating it. He had been left without allies: he attempted to use his brother's alliance with the Lombards to his own advantage in Rome, offering his support against the Lombards to Stephen III and entering into secret negotiations with the "Primicerius", Christopher, whose position had also been left seriously isolated by the Franco-Lombard "rapprochement"; but after the violent murder of Christopher by Desiderius, Stephen III chose to give his support to the Lombards and Charlemagne. [Riche, Pierre, "The Carolingians", 86] Gerberga then fled ("for no reason at all") [Einhard, "The Life of Charlemagne", in Dutton, PE, "Carolingian Civilisation: A Reader", 29] with her sons and Count Autchar, one of Carloman's faithful nobles, to the court of Desiderius, who demanded of the new Pope Hadrian I that he anoint Carloman's sons as Kings of the Franks. However it was, by the end of the year Bertrada and Charlemagne had successfully encircled Carloman: Charlemagne had married Desiderata, the daughter of the Lombard king Desiderius, Carloman's immediate eastern neighbor, and the marriage created an alliance between Charlemagne and the Lombards; Bertrada had also secured for Charlemagne the friendship of Tassilo, Duke of Bavaria, her husband's nephew; she had even attempted to secure Papal support for the marriage by arranging for Desiderius to cede to Rome certain territories to which the Papacy laid claim, although Pope Stephen III remained in theory hostile to an alliance between his allies the Franks and his enemies the Lombards, and in reality deeply conflicted between the threat the Lombards posed to him and the chance to dispose of the anti-Lombard Christopher the Primicerius, the dominant figure at the Papal court.